On a journey through Rajasthan, a stay in Jodphur should not be missed. The “Blue City” offers many cultural highlights. Here are the best sights at a glance. 

The second-largest city in the Indian state of Rajasthan is nicknamed “blue city” because of its many blue-painted houses.

Jodhpur: the best sights

The fortresses, temples and palaces give an impression of the splendid time of the Maharajas. Landscapes and parks show the natural diversity of India. Here are 9 Jodhpur highlights at a glance:

Mehrangarh Fort and Mehrangarh Fort

The imposing Mehrangarh Fortress sits on a 125-meter high mountain. Translated, the name of the building appropriately means »Fortress of the Sun«. The construction of the complex began in the middle of the 15th century. The majority of the preserved fortress, however, dates back to the 17th century. Seven ornate entrance gates are among the highlights.

The former palace inside has been converted into a museum. The fortress museum gives insights into the splendid life world of the Rajput Maharajas. You will see preciously decorated interiors, murals and court objects. For example sedan chairs, textiles and paintings. Takhat Vilas, the sumptuous bedchamber of the Maharaja Takhat Singh, is one of the highlights of the exhibition.

Address: PB No 165, The Fort

Jaswant Thada (Marble Palace)

“White Palace” or “Marble Palace” is popularly called Jasmant Thada. On the way to Mehrangarh Fortress, you will encounter this architectural jewel.

Maharaja Sardar Singh had the mausoleum built-in 1899 in honour of his father. The special feature: Thin marble slabs were used for the construction. The white marble shines in the sunlight and gives the marble palace a mystical flair.

Address: Lawaran, Jodhpur

Ghanta Ghar (Clock Tower) and Sardar Market

The »Big Ben« Jodhpurs is located at the Sardar market. The distinctive clock tower was built in the 19th century on behalf of Maharaja Shri Sardar Singh Ji. The tower is a good landmark.

A visit to the surrounding Sardar market is an experience you should not miss. The market was also built by the Maharaja Sardar and named after him. Small shops are in the sometimes very narrow streets together. The atmosphere is lively, chaotic and colourful. The product range extends from handicrafts, clothing and spices to carpets and antique jewellery.

Address: Nai Sarak, Ghantaghar Market

Umaid Bhavan Palace and Museum

To provide work to the starving population of Jodhpur during a drought, the Maharaja Svasti Shri Rajadhiraja Sahib Umaid Singh Bahadur commissioned the Umaid Bhavan Palace major project in the mid-1920s. The construction took almost 14 years.

With India’s independence from Britain, the Maharajas lost their political power and privileges. Gaj Singh II was the last Maharaja of Jodhpur. Lacking the money to fully renovate the ageing palace in the 1970s, Umaid-Bhavan divided it into three areas: Luxury Hotel, Living Area, and Museum. The museum is also known as the Umaid Palace Museum. On display are exhibits from the possession of the Maharaja: antique clocks, weapons and Art Deco furniture. One area is devoted to the descendants of the Maharajas, who still inhabit the palace’s living quarters.

Address: Cantt Area

Rao Jodha Desert Rock Park

The Desert Rock Park gives you a green break from the hustle and bustle of the city. The 72-hectare complex makes the hearts of nature and hiking fans beat faster. Numerous plant species bear witness to the diversity of the region. There are several hiking trails including one that leads past the lake Devkund to the city wall. With a little luck, you will see butterflies, reptiles and certainly some of the native bird species.

The best suitable time to visit the park is in the morning or evening. Avoid the midday heat.

Address: Rao Jodha Desert Rock Park

Akhal-Nath Temple

Spectacular architecture and cultural heritage make the Achal Nath Temple a significant place. The Hindu temple was built in 1531 and is dedicated to the god Shiva. Details inside and on the outside facade demonstrate impressive architecture. Achal Nath is divided into several ornate halls.

Address: Sodagaran Mohalla 

Bal Samand Lake

In 1159 BC, Bal Samand Lake was built as a reservoir for the waters of the surrounding 

Mountains, gardens with fruit trees surround the lake. Later, the Bal Samand Lake Palace was built as a summer palace. Today the palace is a hotel.

The lake is five kilometres from Jodhpur, a popular spot for picnics, city getaways, and nature exploration.

Address: Bal Samand Lake 

Mandore Garden

Mandore was once the capital of the Pratihara Empire. In the middle of the 15th century, Jodhpur became the new capital. Mandore lost importance and is now a larger village. The Mandore Gardens are a gateway to another time. Stone terraces and temples are among the highlights of the complex. The 18th and 19th-century Maharaja memorials recall the heyday of the lost city.

Address: Mandore Garden

Kunj Bihari Temple

In 1847 Maharaja Vijay Singh Ji erected the Kunj Bihari Temple in memory of his late son. The temple is dedicated to the god Krishna. In and around the temple there are more god statues and paintings to admire. Kunj Bihari is located in the heart of the city. A visit can be perfectly combined with other activities in the city centre of Jodhpur.

Address: Rawaton Ka Bass